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INVISIBLE MAN, GOT THE WHOLE WORLD WATCHING: A Young Black Man’s Education

INVISIBLE MAN, GOT THE WHOLE WORLD WATCHING: A Young Black Man’s Education

One of the country’s most prominent young writers on race delivers an unflinching account of what it means to be a young black man in America today, and how the existing script for black manhood is being rewritten in one of the most fascinating periods of American history.

PRAISE/REVIEWS

“‘Invisible Man, Got the Whole World Watching’ is ambitious, ardent and timely.” —Walton Muyumba, New York Times Book Review 

“An ambitious blend of autobiography and cultural criticism.” New York Times Book Review, Editors’ Choice 

“[an] audacious debut book…This is a must-read book for the generations.” —Charlie Braxton, Washington Post

“…a superbly thoughtful memoir.”—Buzzfeed 

“…wonderful…While Invisible Man, Got the Whole World Watching may not have the answers, its attempt to define the undefined something buzzing about blackness feels like catching lightning in a bottle.”—Atlantic.com, Summer Reading Selection

“[Mychal Denzel Smith] provides perspective into the complexity of blackness that’s commonly lost in discussions about race…this memoir is both groundbreaking and saddening. It might be the first of its kind: a book that offers a comprehensive look into the genesis of black millennial lives through the eyes of a young black man.” —Daren W. Jackson, Chicago Tribune

“Mychal Denzel Smith is one of the most important and vibrant voices of his generation. Born into the grim and brutal realities of systemic racism, police violence, and the prison industrial complex, Smith’s work—searing yet funny—is, in some ways, a miracle. He has survived the grave challenge of simply being a young black man in America and has lived to tell the tale. Smith’s writing, speaking, and television appearances, as well as his incisive use of social media, inspire one to imagine what it would be like if James Baldwin, Richard Wright, or Ralph Ellison were on Twitter.” —Jeremy Scahill, author of Dirty Wars and Blackwater

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